Best Mouse for Top Level Graphic Designers | Chumbart™




How to Choose the Right Mouse for Graphic Design
Before you decide to hand over your money for a new mouse for your needs as a graphic designer, there are a few details about the mouse you need to consider:

  • Wired or Wireless 
  • Laser or Optical 
  • Ergonomics 
  • Full-size or Travel-size 
  • Programmable Buttons 

Wired or Wireless

Whether you choose a mouse that is connected to your computer with a wire or through the computer’s USB port generally comes down to personal preference. After years of struggling and hating all the cords on their desk, some people opt to use a wireless mouse, which avoids the problem of tangled cords but you do run out at the wrong time. While there are some wireless mice out there that come with docks to charge it so you’re not hoarding AAA batteries, you’ll still need to remember to dock the mouse so it can charge. Some mice come with an on/off switch that will help extend the life of the battery you’re using, but again, that’s only useful if you remember to switch it off at the end of the day.
Wireless mice come with a receiver that lets your computer and the mouse “talk” to each other. Some mice come with what’s known as a nano receiver that can sit flush with your computer’s USB port. Some come with a larger wireless receiver that sticks out from the USB port a couple of inches. Those with nano receivers tend to be more expensive than their counterpart, but might be worth checking out, especially if you travel a lot for work. While a wired mouse doesn’t have to worry about batteries or charging because they are plugged into your USB or PS2 port, the downside is that you a tied to your computer. You have a limited length of cord to work with which can be troublesome as well as having to deal with tangled cords that may damage the wire.

Laser or Optical


When you use your mouse, it operates by tracking in dpi, otherwise known as dots per inch. Optical mice typically track between 400 and 800 dpi which is perfectly fine for your regular everyday-use mouse. However, a laser mouse will generally be about to track 2,000 or more dpi. While this number is pretty high and not really necessary for consumers using a mouse for basic functions, such precise tracking can be overkill, even becoming annoying. For those who work in graphic design or those who may be pretty big into gaming, the preciseness and sensitivity that comes with such a high dpi can be a welcome feature.

Ergonomics


As using computers and mice have become the norm in our society, so have the issues with hand and wrist pain that come from the odd angles we keep our hands in while we work. This is why the ergonomics of the mouse you choose is the most important thing to consider before you buy not only a mouse but any peripheral. For mice, in particular, correct ergonomics is important because it can help prevent repetitive stress injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome. Unfortunately, the ergonomics of a mouse isn’t something that is one-size-fits-all, no matter what the manufacturer’s marketing department might tell you.
The only way to really know if you’re going to feel comfortable using a mouse for hours on end, is the same way you know if your shoes fit at the store, is to try them on. Now with computer peripherals, a lot of times products will be boxed up so you cannot “try before you buy” or anything like that so your best option is making sure that you do your research first, like reading this article. Good Job!
When you buy the mouse, be sure that you can return it and how long you have, so you aren’t stuck with a mouse you can’t use. When you get home try it for that amount of time to see if it’s comfortable and doesn’t cause any pain in your arm or wrist. Many people will choose a mouse based on its look which is fine. For graphic designers, however, you will want to focus more on comfort than aesthetics in this case.

Full-size or Travel-size


Most manufacturers make mice in both full-size and travel-size options. Which size you choose can come down to one singular piece of criteria: comfort. Many people who may never take their mouse off their desk will feel more comfortable using a travel-sized mouse because of the comfort that it provides for them, especially if they happen to have smaller hands. Likewise, many people who primarily travel for work will choose a full-size mouse because of the comfort it provides their hand, while a travel mouse may cause them discomfort.

Programmable Buttons


Your standard mouse comes with two buttons and a scroll wheel in the middle. However, there are many mice on the market, tailored for those who may work in specialized fields like graphic design, come with additional buttons on the side of the mouse. These buttons are there so that you can program them, otherwise known as “mapping” them for certain functions. One such example is to set one of the buttons to be a back button when you’re on the internet. These additional buttons can be very handy, especially if you use the same programs over and over. Mapping these buttons to a specific function isn’t very difficult and you should be able to learn how either with the mouse’s manual or on the manufacturer’s website.

Best Mouse for Top Level Graphic Designers in 2018

Like each person’s hands, when it comes to choosing the best mouse for their needs, everyone has different requirements. However, these are what we consider to be the top mice for graphic designers in 2018 and most likely, 2019. 

1. Logitech MX Master 2s

Note from Jacob Cass: I personally use the Logitech MX Master 2s and have used prior models for over 10+ years now. This mouse is extremely comfortable and has all the precision I need for design tasks. Highly recommended!
Computer peripherals and Logitech are pretty much synonymous in today’s market. They tend to produce some of the best products in terms of quality and responsiveness. This can be a great thing when you need a mouse that can handle the precision required of the type of work you do. A cordless mouse, the MX Master 2s is designed to fit comfortably in your hand without causing strain over long periods of use.
With a 4,000 dpi Darkfield sensor, the 2s works on all surfaces, including clear glass. When you come back to your desk to work, the mouse wakes up instantly, providing you with an indicator of the battery’s charge with the three green LEDs on the left side of the mouse. The battery life of the mouse can last up to 70 days from a full charge though in a pinch, you can use the micro-USB on the front of the mouse to charge it while you’re working.
There are buttons located on the side of the mouse that let you change between windows without using your keyboard and is also easily programmable. A scroll wheel on the side of the mouse lets you scroll through web pages or documents quickly and easy, depending on how fast you flick the wheel.
Although it comes with a hefty price tag, the Logitech MX Master 2s is a high-end mouse that has the features and the ergonomic design that makes it a perfect option for a graphic designer.
($99)

2. Apple Magic Mouse 2

People who prefer working with Apple products know that they are buying high-quality and have a very aesthetically pleasing design. With its super-light design, the Magic Mouse 2 from Apple comes with the capability of laser-tracking which can make it easy to switch between pages as well as make changes to your project on just about any surface.
The Magic Mouse is designed to make multi-touch commands easily executed including swiping left and right between pages you are working on and you can bring up Mission Control by double-tapping the mouse with two fingers. While regular scrolling, as well as right-click can be performed on the touch-sensitive surface of the mouse, these can be turned on or off if you’d like.
A big change that comes with the Magic Mouse 2 is how the mouse charges. Gone is the battery-access door, replaced with a Lightning port. While it only takes a couple of minutes to charge the battery long enough to get through a day at work, while keeping the mouse plugged in all night can last a whole month. The only downside about plugged the mouse in to charge it is that the port is on the bottom, meaning you can’t use it while it’s charging.
While many will choose the Magic Mouse 2 because of the brand name, the physical design can take some getting used to. The slim design isn’t very ergonomically friendly putting your hand in an odd position that doesn’t occur with other mice. Overall, while the Magic Mouse 2 from Apple is an impressive mouse and one of the best on the market, it’s not a peripheral that makes it worth buying a computer for.
($79)

3. Anker Vertical Ergonomic Optical Mouse

The first thing that stands out when you look at the Anker Vertical Ergonomic Optical Mouse is the design. Obviously, it looks awkward, but the vertical design is engineered to promote healthy, neutral positioning of your wrist and arm, avoiding repetitive stress injuries otherwise known as RSI.
If you are someone who spends a great deal of time doing graphics designs by primarily using a mouse, having an ergonomic and comfortable mouse or tablet is very important in avoiding RSI. Think of it this way, if you hurt your arm or wrist that means you can’t work. If you can’t work, you can’t get paid so taking the proper precautions to protect yourself helps your bottom line.
While it does have an odd design, the Anker Vertical Ergonomic Optical Mouse provides three different levels of sensitivity 800, 1200, and 1600 dpi to improve the tracking the mouse is capable of. A total of five buttons give you accessibility to scroll, left and right click as well as next and previous buttons which can be helping when going from website to website doing research. Overall, the Anker Vertical Ergonomic Optical Mouse may have a weird design, but for an affordable price, you can protect yourself from possible injury.
($19)

4. Logitech MX Ergo Wireless

At first glance, you might think you’re looking at a mouse that we’ve kept in storage since the 1990s but you’re wrong. The Logitech MX Ergo Wireless may look like a retro-style mouse but that’s only because of the trackball. Very few mice-makers make peripherals with trackballs, choosing to create mice with an optical laser instead.
Logitech continues to support the trackball and many graphic designers are happy that they do. For some, using a trackball while working on creative projects can make the work feel more comfortable, intuitive and precise. To provide you with a more natural hand position, an adjustable hinge lets you change the angle of the trackball from zero to twenty degrees.
The Logitech MX Ergo Wireless has fully customizable buttons and with the Logitech Flow system, you can control two different screens with the same mouse. A full charge of the battery lasts for four months while charging for just one minute can give you a full day’s charge. If you’re used to using a trackball to work on projects, with all the features and option that the MX Ergo has to offer, it makes absolute sense to chose this mouse
($79)

5. Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Mouse 3600

For many years, Microsoft was primarily known as a software company, putting out programs like Office and Windows. But more and more, the tech giant has gotten into the hardware side of things. With products like the Surface and even the Bluetooth Mobile Mouse 3600, people have started seeing Microsoft as much more than a software company.
A very reliable mouse, it doesn’t kid around by trying to be something that it isn’t. While its small enough for people with smaller hands to use comfortably on a daily basis or if you happen to work primarily on the road and don’t want to carry a full-sized mouse with you. While it may not be the most expensive mouse on the market, the quality of how it is built should keep your attention.
Now, at this point, we figure that you’re asking why this little mouse would make our top 5 list and that’s because even though it is small in stature, its ambidextrous design makes it great in either hand and usable on just about any surface.
But most importantly, to us, it is the perfect back up mouse. Just about all of the mice on our list either have batteries or need to be charged, but like most of us, we tend to forget things and in a pinch, if you mouse’s batteries die or it loses it charge, the Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Mouse 3600 is a very suitable option.
($29)

Choosing the best mouse for your designing needs


When it comes time to buy the best mouse for your needs as a graphic designer, there can be a lot more choices out there than you might have thought. At first glance though, it may be easy to label each mouse out there as basically the same. Because of this, before you buy anything, you need to make sure you do your research so that you are getting one that gives you the features, the design, and extras you are looking for.

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